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FAQs

Questions about the VINTNER 225L home winemaker

Can the VINTNER 225L really make better wine or beer than a conventional system?

The system the VINTNER 225L home winemaker employs reduces movement of the product during fermentation. Every time you disturb wine, beer, or cider during fermentation it can become exposed to oxygen and light, which will break down the product. This system eliminates the light by use of the stainless fermenters, and reduces the movement by half, resulting in a better end product.

What about temperature? I've heard it's important to make great wine.

I get this question a lot. Yeast requires a temperature of between 90-100 degrees Fahrenheit or 30-35 degrees Celsius to rehydrate, similar to making bread. Temperature is very important when starting the yeast fermentation, but once the yeast has been hydrated properly it will create its own heat. The fermentation temperature isn’t that critical, as long as it doesn’t get to the extremes.

Temperatures between 50-90 degrees Fahrenheit are usually safe, and will only affect the speed of the fermentation process.

If the “must” or “wort” is lower than 70 degrees Fahrenheit, the fermentation will be slow, and if it’s higher than 80 degrees Fahrenheit, it will be a quick fermentation.

Can I leave the wine in the fermenter longer than the instructions say?

Yes, absolutely! As long as the fermentation was “healthy” (you added yeast nutrients with DAP on day 2) then you could leave it for months without harm.

There is a french wine making method called sur lie which allows the fermented wine to sit on the lees (dead yeast) for an extended period of time, with occasional stirring to release polysaccharides. This can improve the overall structure and create a distinctive yeasty aroma and taste.

Can I make wine from fresh fruit using the VINTNER 225L?

Yes, but you will need to extract the juice from the fruit first as the small pre-filter in the bottom of each fermenter cannot handle too many solids without clogging.

Can I use grape skin packs from premium wine kits in the stainless vats?

Yes! The stainless vats and pre-filter can handle a small amount of solids without the need to put them in cheese cloth, along with any oak chips. However, if your premium wine kit came with a large amount of dried grape skins, we’ve got 6 easy steps you can follow:

  1. Insert the cheese cloth supplied in the kit into the stainless vat.
  2. Secure the cheese cloth to the top of the vat and open it. This makes it easier to fill with the grape skins.
  3. Fill the cheese cloth, then tie a knot and allow it to rest in the vat.
  4. Add the ingredients in the kit and your juice as usual.
  5. Remove the cheese cloth after 7-10 days. Make sure to squeeze out the goodness before discarding!
  6. Top up the vat to the 23 litre mark.

Some mid size kits also contain a small amount of dried grape skins. No need to put these in cheese cloth though; just throw them into the fermenter along with any oak chips.

How do I make a 23 litre wine kit if I only add to the 20 litre mark on day one?

The VINTNER 225L home winemaker supports brewing 23 litre wine kits. Here’s how to do it:

Fill to the 20 litre mark on day 1 and place the rest of your juice in the refridgerator. On day 4 or 5 you can add the remaining juice slowly to the fermenting wine.

Will my wine taste "yeasty" if I let it sit too long on the dead yeast?

Unless you let it sit for years, no. Your wine can sit on the dead yeast as long as it was a good fermentation. The french use a technique called sur lie which allows the fermented wine to sit on the lees (dead yeast) for an extended period of time, with occasional stirring to release polysaccharides. This can improve the overall mouthfeel and giving the wine more structure.

Videos

Getting started with the VINTNER 225L home winemaker